Sunday, June 8, 2014

Collective Consumption: Social Media And Active Learning

Source: Digital Insights
It comes as no surprise that the Internet grows exponentially by the minute, and in some cases by the second. It’s too late to turn back the clock, and it’s no wonder that our learners view school regulations of social media archaic and restrictive. We see the weekly chats with frustrated teachers who try to get colleagues to see the benefits of Twitter; yet this is not even the most popular media with our tweens, let alone young people under thirty.

Two interactive resources that reinforce the speed of content delivery are Social Media 2014 and The Internet In Real-Time. Talk about a reality check; no wonder students view schools as medieval places with stoic views of the world, devoid of passion and engagement. To deviate from the system is heresy.

Source: The Internet In Real-Time
Data does not lie. In the interactive infographic about social media statistics published by Digital Insights, the numbers are staggering. Instagram is the preferred social media for teens, with 23% ranking it as their favorite. Snapchat boasts 400 million images per day. Likewise, The Internet In Real-Time is equally as enlightening. The Pandora’s box is open, and we cannot put content back in the box, restrict its access, or prevent students from using everything at their disposal to learn.

Source: Digital Insights
The more we control desire to deliver content in prescribed silos, the more likely we are to lose young, bright minds with ideas that we can cultivate and take to new heights. Instead, learning goes underground and outside of school. Sure, we like to think we do our best to incorporate as much technology to serve our curricula, but restrictions on whom kids can email, outright blocking of websites, and banning social media defeat the purpose for a collaborative, shared learning environment.

Source: The Internet In Real-Time
Are schools scared? Is their view that kids will use it inappropriately, or is it because schools can’t measure or assess it? Our learners are using it now. If we want to teach and engage this generation, teachers need freedom to use social media, and reluctant teachers who see no purpose in it need to step up to the plate and learn it. We can’t afford not to participate in what is currently used by our learners and by every type of company they may work for in the future.

Source: The Internet In Real-Time
We need to adjust how we teach and with what tools. It’s high time school policies lift access restrictions and help teachers design curricula that actively uses social media to create and deliver content. The collective consumption of knowledge has changed because of technology, and learners need to be able to use it, search it, and share it.

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